Why Amazon Dominates in Shopping and Everything Else. Understand how Amazon dominates to help your own business as well as your clients. An in-depth look into the strategies and philosophies behind Amazon’s explosive success (a 12,496 word brief).

 Index of Larger Sections Below:
Reasons Why Amazon Dominates: How the Giant’s Business Strategies make them Unstoppable
Amazon is dedicated to their customers and the satisfaction of their customers.
Focusing on competition is less important than customer satisfaction at Amazon.
Amazon keeps the customer’s wants at the forefront of their minds during meetings.
Amazon’s business strategy is built around the things that don’t change in society; they focus on the things that are reliably constant.
• Amazon takes calculated risks for market leadership.
Amazon dominates because they know having a company made of people from diverse backgrounds and points of view is crucial to inventing for all of their customers worldwide.
Amazon believes in and supports diversity, embraces and nourishes culture, and has strong values.
Amazon’s 14 Principles for Leadership
Culture and Diversity at Amazon
Amazon Builds Communities through Affinity Groups
Amazon’s Affinity Groups Stay Integrated with the Community to Better Serve and Support It.
There is Equality for All Amazonians – Why? Because it’s a right, not a luxury.
Amazon is not necessarily worried about short-term; instead they concentrate on the long-term outcome.
Amazon is willing to invent frequently and potential fail for the chance of success.
Amazon’s customers get competitive pricing.
Amazon’s marketing approach is to deliver awesome service to their customers to get word of mouth referrals (as well as SEO and PPC).
Amazon employees are trained to comprehend the customer experience so they genuinely understand the customer.
Amazon’s not done. Part of their business philosophy is that it is dangerous not to evolve.
Amazon dominates by keeping meetings productive.
Amazon dominates by supporting the needs of their employees.
Amazon Understands the Needs of their Employees Starting a Family
Amazon Rewards Employees with Paid Time-Off, Employee Assistant Programs, as well as Health and Financial benefits.
Amazon makes their employees think like owners by making them owners with stock options.
Amazon continues to dominate by offering tech innovations that help their customers.
Amazon dominates by selling its own private label lines
Amazon dominates by offering exclusive marketing arrangements
Amazon Dominates through Innovative Shipping and Delivery Programs
Amazon Dominates because of who its founder is: Jeff Bezos, from teenage ranch hand to richest man in the world
Amazon continues to dominate by offering a wide array of subscriptions and services to meet their customers’ needs.
Amazon maintains and expands their customer base by offering endless perks to its loyal Prime Members
Amazon Prime Day: Amazon is such a trendsetter that they created their own shopping holiday and people love to celebrate it annually.
Amazon dominates through streamlining the selling process and ability for others.
70 Stats and Facts that prove Amazon Dominates in Shopping and Everything Else

Reasons Why Amazon Dominates: How the Giant’s Business Strategies make them Unstoppable

Founded in 1994, Amazon has grown from an online bookstore, whose operations were run out of a garage, to THE everything you need company, operating globally, dominating in everything from video and audio streaming media services, to being the world largest online shopping retailer and biggest cloud infrastructure service provider.

But why? Why has Amazon shown such radical growth and dominance in industry after industry?

As Amazon founder (Jeff Bezos) explained, “We’ve had three big ideas at Amazon that we’ve stuck with for 18 years, and they’re the reason we’re successful: Put the customer first. Invent. And be patient.

“The reasons why Amazon has been so successful can be attributed to multiple factors, including but not limited to: putting the customer first, taking risks, establishing strong principles for leadership, customer centric innovations, cultivating diversity, and the main man behind the machine, Jeff Bezos.

Entrepreneurs can use the information found in this page to potentially help establish and then develop their businesses and their clients’ businesses into successful, innovative, helpful companies, where doing what’s best for the customer is at the forefront of their operations.

“Billionaire Jeff Bezos: Amazon’s Journey to Now And Its Future (2017 Interview)”

Thank you to Investors Archive for the use of their video.

Why does Amazon Dominate?

Amazon is dedicated to their customers and the satisfaction of their customers.

Amazon’s dedication towards their customers is apparent in their mission statement: “Our vision is to be Earth’s most customer centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”

Bezos has said many time that one of the main reasons why they are so successful is that they, “Put the customer first.”

But why would this make Amazon more successful?

Bezos asserts that, “If you’re truly obsessed about your customers it will cover a lot of your other mistakes” and “If we can arrange things in such a way that our interests are aligned with our customers, then in the long-term that will work out really well for customers and it will work out really well for Amazon.

Bezos believes, “Focusing on the customer makes a company more resilient.”

“Jeff Bezos’s Top 10 Rules For Success (@JeffBezos)”

Thank you to Evan Carmichael for the use of this video.

Focusing on competition is less important than customer satisfaction at Amazon.

“We’re not competitor obsessed, we’re customer obsessed. We start with what the customer needs and we work backwards,” explained Bezos.

Amazon is customer obsessed instead of competitor obsessed because, in the words of Bezos, “If you’re competitor-focused, you have to wait until there is a competitor doing something. Being customer-focused allows you to be more pioneering.”

Bezos wrote in 2015, “Many companies describe themselves as customer-focused, but few walk the walk. Most big technology companies are competitor focused. They see what others are doing, and then work to fast follow.”

Amazon keeps the customer’s wants at the forefront of their minds during meetings.

In early years, during meetings, Bezos kept an empty chair in the room. Why? This is done to make attending Amazonians imagine a customer in the meeting with them, reminding them to consider what it is the customer actually wants. Why would Bezos want employees to be reminded of the customer and consider their wants? As Bezos says, “[the customer is] the most important person in the room.”

Amazon’s business strategy is built around the things that don’t change in society; they focus on the things that are reliably constant.

Bezos explains why it is important to base your business strategy around the predictable things in society:

“I very frequently get the question, ‘What’s gonna change in the next 10 years?’ I almost never get the question, ‘What’s not going to change in the next 10 years?’ And I submit to you that that second question is actually the more important of the two. Because you can build a business strategy around the things that are stable in time.”

“I can’t imagine that ten years from now they are going to say, ‘I love Amazon, but if only they could deliver my products a little more slowly.’ And they’re not going to, ten years from now, say, ‘I really love Amazon, but I wish their prices were a little higher.’”

“Base your strategy on things that won’t change. Whereas, if you base your strategy first and foremost on more transitory things—who your competitors are, what kind of technologies are available, and so on—those things are going to change so rapidly that you’re going to have to change your strategy very rapidly, too.”

“2012 re:Invent Day 2: Fireside Chat with Jeff Bezos & Werner Vogels”

Thank you to Amazon Web Services for the use of their video.

Amazon takes calculated risks for market leadership.

Why? Because the potential payout is well worth the potential failure.

In a 1997 letter, Bezos wrote, “Given a 10 percent chance of a 100-times payout, you should take that bet every time.” “Failure and invention are inseparable twins. To invent you have to experiment, and if you know in advance that it’s going to work, it’s not an experiment.”

New York Times headline bore: “Whole Foods Deal Shows Amazon’s Prodigious Tolerance for Risk”. Writer David Streitfeld wrote, “Joke all you want about drone-delivered kale and arugula.” He continued, “Amazon’s $13.4 billion bet to take on the $800 billion grocery business in the United States by acquiring Whole Foods fits perfectly into the retailer’s business model…. Unlike almost any other chief executive, Amazon’s founder, Jeff Bezos, has built his company by embracing risk, ignoring obvious moves and imagining what customers want next — even before they know it.”

Amazon dominates because they know having a company made of people from diverse backgrounds and points of view is crucial to inventing for all of their customers worldwide.

Why, because diversity and inclusion are not only good for business, they are right.

In late 2016 Bezos wrote, “…the importance of diversity is represented in our Leadership Principles. Amazon has always been, and always will be, committed to equal rights, tolerance and diversity. And we firmly reject, and have zero tolerance for, harassment of any kind.

We’re a company of builders whose diverse backgrounds, ideas, and points of view are critical to helping us invent on behalf of all our customers. But it’s not only that diversity and inclusion are good for our business. It’s more fundamental than that — it’s simply right. These are enduring values for us—and nothing will change that.” 

Amazon believes in and supports diversity, embraces and nourishes culture, and has strong values.

Amazon shows these things through their 14 leadership principals, diversity, and company culture.

Amazon’s 14 Principles for Leadership

  • Customer Obsession
  • Ownership
  • Invent and Simplify
  • Are Right, A Lot
  • Learn and Be Curious
  • Hire and Develop the Best
  • Insist on the Highest Standards
  • Think Big
  • Bias for Action
  • Frugality
  • Earn Trust
  • Dive Deep
  • Have Backbone; Disagree and Commit
  • Deliver Results

“Amazon’s 14 Leadership Principles via Jeff Bezos”

Thank you to Dan Croitor for the use of his video.

Amazon’s 14 Leadership Principles Explained

1. Customer Obsession
Amazon leaders need to start with the customer’s needs and work backwards. It is of the utmost importance to earn and obtain the customer’s trust. Leaders may notice and understand the competition but the customer is at the forefront of their minds and decisions.

Pic: "Customers rule! And so do listeners! - Jeff Bezos" Autographed in a door-table of Audible, an Amazon co.

2. Ownership
Amazon leaders are owners. Leaders need to keep long-term outcomes and ideas in their mind. Long-term value cannot be compromised in order to gain short-term metrics. Leaders will make decisions and changes on behalf of the whole Amazon Company, not just their department. A leader would not say “that’s not my job.”

3. Invent and Simplify
Amazon Leaders must presume and command innovative inventions and development. Leaders will always take what is developed and do what it takes to make it simpler. Amazon’s leaders have a broad perception of what is happening universally to cultivate new ideas. Leaders are “not limited by ‘not invented here.’” Amazon leaders understand that their new innovations may not be understood by the masses for extended periods.

 4. Are Right, A Lot
“Leaders are right a lot.” Amazon leaders will have good judgment and strong gut-feelings (instincts). Leaders at Amazon will look for beliefs that are opposite of theirs to see if they hold water. They will pursue points of views that are diverse.

5. Learn and Be Curious
The leaders of Amazon do not know everything and will thus pursue more knowledge and methods to advance and improve themselves. These leaders are inquisitive and explorative.

6. Hire and Develop the Best
Amazon leaders seek out the best of the best and should raise the bar each time they hire or promote anyone. Leaders know that it is important to share and thus move people with an outstanding aptitude to the places in the company where they can make the biggest impact. Amazon leaders create new leaders who are serious about mentoring others. Amazon leaders help nurture and develop the careers of their employees.

 7. Insist on the Highest Standards
Amazon leaders have ceaselessly extraordinary standards; they are seen excessive by some. The bar is continuously being set higher and higher, pressing employees to create better quality services, processes, and products. True Amazon leaders will not send issues to the next department. They fix issues where they develop.

8. Think Big
Amazon leaders construct and speak a brave course that motivates results. Leaders have a big way of thinking. They look into the future to find ways to innovate and serve customers better.

 9. Bias for Action
In a fast-paced, ever changing business, swiftness matters. Changes are not irreversible and thus do not need wide-ranging analysis. Calculated risk is encouraged.

 10. Frugality
Leaders are encouraged to “accomplish more with less.” Inventiveness is a product of limitations. No leader of Amazon will be congratulated for a bigger budget, fixed expenses, or a bigger headcount. Do more with less.

Bezos explains, “I think frugality drives innovation, just like other constraints do. One of the only ways to get out of a tight box is to invent your way out.”

 11. Earn Trust
The leaders of Amazon considerately listen to other, talk honestly and straightforwardly, while treating others with respect. Leaders set targets for their teams against the upper echelon. Leaders are not afraid to talk of their failures or be critical of their actions.

 12. Dive Deep
No undertaking is below an Amazon leader. They function at all heights, remain associated to the particulars, assess everything regularly, and are suspicious when “metrics and anecdote” are different.

13. Have Backbone; Disagree and Commit
Amazon leaders are duty-bound to humbly contest choices when they oppose them, even when attesting them will be difficult, strenuous, or time consuming. Amazon leaders have strong opinions. Amazon leaders have tenacity. Amazon leaders are not afraid to create waves for what they believe in. They will not bend their opinion to keep things civil with colleagues.

 14. Deliver Results
Amazon leaders concentrate on the fundamental points for their production. They deliver the correct level of quality. They deliver them in a timely manner. They never succumb to obstacles or settle for something lesser than the correct level of quality.

Culture and Diversity at Amazon

Diverse thinking at Amazon
There are millions of customers who reap the benefits of Amazon having a diverse team and a diverse way of thinking. Amazon believes that “diversity and inclusion” are good for business. At Amazon, they say they are dedicated to “tolerance and diversity.” Amazon wants to develop leaders of all types to help serve their customers around the globe.

Amazon employs workers from all kinds of backgrounds. Amazon’s team is made up of people from various educations, professional experiences, races, genders, sexual orientations, ages, cultures, disabilities, and life experiences.

Why keep diversity and culture at the forefront of the business?

For every decision or invention at Amazon, this vast diversity brings forth a variety of opinions and life experiences that shape the outcome of Amazon’s products and operations.

Amazon Builds Communities through Affinity Groups

Amazon’s affinity groups are chapters of people with similarities who network, plan events in the community, and help each other.

Why affinity groups?

Through their Affinity Groups, Amazon connects individuals from different businesses and locations. Affinity Groups deliver their feedback and advice on areas where Amazon should concentrate its plans for diversity. Affinity Groups help create internal career expansion networks and help attain community integration.

Amazon’s Affinity Groups:

Amazon’s Warriors: Employees who have served in the armed forces in their country, and Amazon employees who support them, are Amazon Warriors. Some of these employees still currently serve in the military, as well as working at Amazon. This Affinity Group supplies a like-minded career group to support veterans as they transition into joining the Amazon team. This group is also charged with the task of helping Amazon recruit upper echelon military talent, done via the Amazon Military Talent Partnership.

Glamazon: Keeping with Amazon’s belief in diversity and inclusion, Glamazon helps to inform its team on LGBTQ, its hardships, and its prospects. The group is on a mission to guide both LGBTQ and non- LGBTQ colleagues. The group is charged with encouraging variety and visibility during recruitment and at Amazon. The group sponsors PRIDE parades and throws cross-corporate social occasions.

Glamazon started at Amazon in 1999. It was the third affinity group at Amazon. It was started by an employee who wanted to network with other LGBT Amazon employees. There are now more than 40 glamazon chapters worldwide.

Amazon People with Disabilities: The Affinity Group of Amazonian’s with Disabilities is called AmazonPWD. The group is committed to establishing a workforce that understands and supports its colleagues with disabilities. AmazonPWD undertakes the task of educating coworkers of people with disabilities, career development for people with disabilities, and creating accessibility for both Amazon workers and customers. 

Women@Amazon: This Affinity Group delivers a link between women, both at Amazon and in the community. It delivers encouragement and support to female personnel and it helps to stimulate gender diversity at Amazon. The group is charged with networking women’s groups to attract great talent to Amazon. Women@Amazon supports the Amazon Circles Program. The Amazon Circles Program is a worldwide effort designed to provide support for peer mentoring programs. Yearly, Women@Amazon hosts the AmazeCon Conference with the Amazon Women in Finance and Amazon Women in Engineering Affinity Groups. The conference concentrates on the advancements generated by gender-diverse teams.

Latinos@Amazon: This Affinity Group delivers a link between Latino communities and employees. It delivers encouragement and support to Latino personnel and helps to stimulate diversity at Amazon. The group is charged with recruiting and connecting its Latino workers across the globe. They provide community social and cultural events. They also provide recruiting events at universities and national conferences.

Asians@Amazon: This Affinity Group delivers a link between Asian communities. It delivers encouragement and support to Asian personnel and helps to stimulate diversity at Amazon. The group is charged with recruiting and connecting its Asian workers across the globe. They provide community and career building opportunities, as well as provide community outreach and recruiting events.

Amazon’s Black Employee Network: The Black Employee Network (also known as BEN) at Amazon is a support network for black employees. The group is tasked with nurturing diversity at Amazon while recruiting and empowering Black employees at Amazon. Amazon’s Black Employee Network delivers workshops for career development and personal growth (for employees, interns, and people in the community). Amazon’s Black Employee Network plans the yearly Seattle Urban League Young Professionals Leadership Summit, participates in chapters of the National Society of Black Engineers, participates in Hour of Code (hosted by Code.org), and heads recruitment visits to Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Amazon Women in Engineering: AWE (or Amazon Women in Engineering) nurtures the workplace for woman savvy in tech. AWE has over 30 chapters around the globe. The group is tasked with creating a vast network of like-minded individuals and opportunities for interns and Amazon employees. The group supports community programs to boost the number of girls and women joining the STEM field.

Amazon Women in Finance Initiative: The Women in Finance Initiative is also cleverly known as WiFi. The group provides a global platform for numbers driven women in finance. This allows a networking ability to help WiFi promote and create a more inclusive workforce for women. WiFi focuses on career development through training and community outreach.

Amazon’s Affinity Groups Stay Integrated with the Community to Better Serve and Support It.

Amazon’s Affinity Groups are highly active in their local communities:

  • Rainier Scholars is supported by Latinos@Amazon and the Black Employee Network (BEN). The Affinity Groups attend tours for the scholastic development programs, mail care packages to Rainier Scholars attending university, and host receptions at work.
  • Amazon Women of Engineering (AWE) educates youth about career prospects in the tech field. AWE does this by hosting a Seattle based Technology Open House.
  • AWE also backs young ladies in Tech Out!. Tech Out! is a day workshop for young ladies, ages 7 to 12. It offers girls a chance to experience engineering and technology through an applied workshop. The event is also supported by the University of Washington and Google.
  • Black Employee Network (BEN) was responsible for throwing a 2-day event, “hackathon” in the Amazon Seattle headquarters. This was during black history month and was coined “Black to the Future.” The event attracted local officials, data scientist, developers, community members, and designers. They were tasked with imagining and creating a more flawless future.
  • Amazon joins nationwide discussions on vital problems confronting the LGBTQ population. 3 Amazon Team members, Bowen Ames, Robyn Kanner, and Annabelle Richard Backman, were chosen to join in the White House LGBT Tech & Innovation Briefing.
  • Amazon stood up against Proposition I-1515 so that all transgender people and their families would be treated equally under US Law.
  • Glamazon, sponsors and supports PRIDE Parades around the world. Amazon’s LGBTQ Affinity Group, backed PRIDE parades in places such as London, Costa Rica, and Vancouver B.C.
  • Glamazon has also joined in the Seattle Ends AIDS Walk, for 4 years running.
  • Amazon is active in International Women’s Day. This past year, Amazon celebrated by globally displaying female authors on Amazon homepages. Amazon also held live video sessions with motivating female presenters (from within the company).
  • During the calendar year, Amazon hosts development symposiums for women. These conventions give women a platform for networking, career development, and skill development opportunities.

There is Equality for All Amazonians – Why? Because it’s a right, not a luxury.

On June 14 of 2016 Amazon signed the Equal Pay Pledge from the White House.

In 2016, Amazon compensation reports revealed that:

  • Females received 99.7 cents for each dollar that males earned in identical positions
  • Minorities received 99.7 cents for each dollar that white team members earned in identical positions

Amazon is not necessarily worried about short-term; instead they concentrate on the long-term outcome.

Why? Because it is more important to focus on what will be good for the customer in the long run.

Amazon’s founder, Bezos, explains:
“Most initiatives we undertake take 5 to 7 years before they pay any dividends for the company.” 

“We are comfortable planting seeds and waiting for them to grow into trees.”

Bezos went on to say, “We don’t focus on the optics of the next quarter; we focus on what is going to be good for customers. I think this aspect of our culture is rare.”

Amazon is willing to invent frequently and potential fail for the chance of success.

Bezos explains why, “If you invent frequently and are willing to fail, then you never get to that point where you really need to bet the whole company. [Amazon Web Services] also started about six or seven years ago. We are planting more seeds right now, and it is too early to talk about them, but we are going to continue to plant seeds. And I can guarantee you that everything we do will not work. And, I am never concerned about that. We are stubborn on vision. We are flexible on details.”

Amazon’s customers get competitive pricing.

Why? Satisfied customers keep coming back. Customers want competitive pricing.

Bezos adds, “There are two kinds of retailers: those folks who work to figure how to charge more, and companies that work to figure how to charge less, and we are going to be the second.”

Amazon can offer lower prices by not overspending on unnecessary things; for example, the company does not fly first-class 

“There is a ton of fine-grained innovation that happens on a daily basis. That kind is super-important—things that make our operations more efficient and lower cost so we can afford to offer lower prices to our customers,” Bezos explains.

Amazon’s marketing approach is to deliver awesome service to their customers to get word of mouth referrals (as well as SEO and PPC).

Why? Bezos asserts that, “If you do build a great experience, customers tell each other about that. Word of mouth is very powerful” and that, “If you make customers unhappy in the physical world, they might each tell six friends. If you make customers unhappy on the Internet, they can each tell 6,000.”

Amazon employees are trained to comprehend the customer experience so they genuinely understand the customer.

Why? It allows employees to better address the customer’s needs while bettering the company.

Bezos commands, “Everyone has to be able to work in a call center.”

Each year during training sessions for Amazon managers, Bezos and management teams (composed of thousands of Amazon employees) spend 2 days training in the call-center. At Amazon, the customer is first. Innovations are done for the benefit of the customer. The only way Amazonian’s can understand the customer is to listen to them and understand their experiences, first-hand, so the employee can improve the company by better addressing the customer’s needs.

Amazon’s not done. Part of their business philosophy is that it is dangerous not to evolve.

They will keep evolving, offering more products, more services, more technology, and more innovations to satisfy the needs of their customers.

Jeff Bezos explains why: “Jeff Bezos – ‘What’s dangerous is not to evolve’”
Thank you to Fast Company for the use of their video.

Amazon dominates by keeping meetings productive.

Bezos has a “Two-Pizza Rule”.

The two-pizza rule asserts that if you can’t feed all the people at the meeting with two pizzas, there are too many people at the meeting.

Too many people equals less productivity. Amazon has meetings that meet the two-pizza rule to increase productivity and thus the bottom line.

Amazon dominates by supporting the needs of their employees.

Amazon Career Choice Program
At Amazon, choosing a career path is encouraged through the Amazon Career Choice Program.

The field chosen does not need to keep the employee at Amazon.

Why? Amazon wants employees to achieve their goals. So much so that Amazon is creating classrooms at fulfillment centers so technical courses can be taught onsite.

After Amazonians have been at Amazon for at least one consecutive year, they are eligible for the Amazon Career Choice Program. The program will prepay all but 5% of fees and tuition for obtaining associates degrees (or certificates) in professions that are in demand. That’s 95% of tuition and fees completely covered.

Over 10k Amazonians (from at least 10 countries) have taken advantage of Amazon’s Career Choice program.

Amazon Understands the Needs of their Employees Starting a Family

Amazon offers maternity and parental leave programs.

Maternity Leave:
The program consists of up to four weeks of compensated pre-partum medical leave, trailed by ten weeks of compensated maternity leave.

Parental Leave:
New parent Amazon employees (who have been at the company for at least 1 year) are eligible to use six weeks salaried parental leave. The six weeks of leave can be taken for 6 consecutive weeks. Instead, new parents have the option to take 2 periods of leave (within the first 1 year of the new birth or adoption).

Leave Share Program:
The Amazon Leave Share Program allows Amazon employees to share some or all of the paid parental leave. It can be shared with a spouse or partner who is working but their employer doesn’t give salaried parental time-off.

Ramp Back Program:
The Amazon Ramp Back Program was put in place for new moms or primary caregivers who are rejoining the workforce after leave for a new birth. The program gives primary caregivers a selection of part-time opportunities and a max of eight weeks flextime.

Adoption Assistance Benefit:
Amazon’s Adoption Assistance benefit gives new parents monetary support after a national adoption or international adoption. Employees in the United States (who are eligible) may be compensated for expenses. Eligible expenses include: attorney fees, adoption fees, travel fees, and court fees. Eligible employees can be reimbursed up to $5k for the adoption expenses of one child and up to $10k for a “sibling-group adoption”.

Amazon Rewards Employees with Paid Time-Off, Employee Assistant Programs, as well as Health and Financial benefits.

Amazon is dedicated to helping their employees.

Why? A well taken care of employees is better able to take care of the customer.

Amazon offers different benefits to workers in different countries. In the United States, Amazon offers health benefits, financial benefits, employee assistance programs, time off benefits, and stock benefits.

Health Benefits:
Amazon offers a selection between four different medical plans. They also offer benefits for prescription drug coverage.

Employees are also eligible to receive supplementary dental and/or vision health plan.

Financial Benefits:
Amazon employees are eligible for flexible spending accounts for dependent care and healthcare.

Amazon pays for life and accident coverage. Amazon also offers voluntary dependent coverage.

Long-term disability and short-term disability plans are offered by and paid for by Amazon.

Eligible employees can set up 401(k) retirement saving plans with company match.

Employee Assistance Programs:
Amazon offers employees and family members of employees an anonymous and feeless EAP (or Employee Assistance Program). The program can be utilized for personal issues or work-related problems. Examples of reasons someone may use this EAP: family problems, work issues, legal issues, financial questions, etc.

Amazon offers employees elder support, child support, and pet assistance programs.

Amazon supports employees starting a family through adoption. Amazon will reimburse employees up to $10k in adoption costs.

Paid Time-off:
Amazon workers get paid time off for six annual holidays.

Amazon employees also receive paid time off for vacation and a maximum of six paid personal days off per calendar year.

Amazon uses trust to allow workers a flexible schedule for working hours.

Amazon offers expecting mothers 4 weeks pre-partum leave as well as 10 weeks of maternity leave (paid).

All new parents can take up to 6 weeks paid time off within the first year of a new birth or adoption.

“Leave Share” allows new-parents to share their 6 weeks with their working partner or spouse that does not get paid leave through work.

“Ramp Back” allows new primary caregivers and/or mothers the choice of full-time or part-time work as well as up to eight weeks of flexible work hours.

Amazon makes their employees think like owners by making them owners with stock options.

Going back to Amazon’s Leadership Principles, Amazon wants its employees to think like owners. Eligible employees are rewarded with Amazon.com, Inc. RSUs (or Restricted Stock Units).

Amazon continues to dominate by offering tech innovations that help their customers.

“My view is there’s no bad time to innovate. You should be doing it when times are good and when times are tough—and you want to be doing it around things that your customers care about. For us, it’s such a deep-seated belief, I’m not sure we have a choice,” said Bezos.

Bezos added, “I believe you have to be willing to be misunderstood if you’re going to innovate. That’s actually a serious point. If you’re going to do something that’s never been done before—which is basically what innovation is—people are going to misunderstand it just because it’s new.”

Amazon Tech Innovations:
Alexa
Alexa is a voice service created by Amazon. It is the “voice” and brain that runs Amazon developed devices such as the Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Plus, Echo Sport, and Echo Show. It is a voice activated personal assistant.

Alexa can control things like your music apps, set timers, add things to your calendar, make phone calls, send text messages, answer questions, report the news, check the weather, and order things via the user’s Amazon.com account.

Alexa is not all business. Alexa can do things like tell jokes, rap, play Jeopardy, and play 20 questions.

When hooked up to a smart home, Alexa can control things like TVs, thermostats, lights, fans, and locks.

Alexa creates a personalized experience for users through “skills.” Alexa has over 25k skills. Companies like Fitbit, Uber, Amazon, Dominos, Starbucks, and Capital One have developed competencies/skills for the platform so that users can perform functions with the companies via Alexa.

“What Is Alexa? An Introduction to Amazon’s Voice Service”

Thank you to Alexa Developers for the use of their video.

Echo
Amazon Echo (or Echo) is a line of intelligent speakers. The smart speaker interface connects with the smart personal assistant system, Alexa. It is voice activated.

The first generation of the Amazon Echo was in the development phase starting in at least 2010.

The first generation Echo was initially available to Amazon Prime members or by invite only. In June 2015, the Amazon Echo was launched to the public.

Current Echo Versions:

Echo Dot

  • The Echo Dot is the smallest echo. It is 3 inches x 3.3 inches x 3.3 inches.
  • It weights about 5.7ounces.
  • It has a 0.6 inch speaker.
  • The system will add Alexa capabilities to the room you place the Echo in.
  • It can stream Wi-fi music (such as: Amazon Music, Pandora, and Spotify)
  • It connects with a 3.5 mm cable and/or Bluetooth.
  • Allows free audio calls to US, Mexico, and Canada.
  • When hooked up, it can control smart home devices.
  • Currently costs $49.99.

Echo

  • The Echo is 5.9 inches x 3.5 inches x 3.5 inches.
  • It weights about 0 ounces.
  • It has a 2.5 inch woofer and a 0.6 inch tweeter.
  • The system has Dolby Dual-speakers with enough power to fill a room with music.
  • It can stream Wi-fi music (such as: Amazon Music, Pandora, and Spotify)
  • It connects with a 3.5 mm cable and/or Bluetooth.
  • Allows free audio calls to US, Mexico, and Canada.
  • When hooked up, it can control smart home devices.
  • Currently starts at $99.99.

Echo Plus

  • The Echo Plus is 3 inches x 3.3 inches x 3.3 inches.
  • It weights about 6 ounces.
  • It has a 2.5 inch woofer and a 0.8 inch tweeter.
  • The system incorporates a built-in hub. This creates an easier setup of compatible linked smart home devices.
  • The system has Dolby Dual-speakers with enough power to fill a room with music.
  • It can stream Wi-fi music (such as: Amazon Music, Pandora, and Spotify)
  • It connects with a 3.5 mm cable and/or Bluetooth.
  • Allows free audio calls to US, Mexico, and Canada.
  • When hooked up, it can control smart home devices.
  • Currently costs $149.99.

Echo Spot

  • The Echo Spot is 1 inches x 3.8 inches x 3.6 inches.
  • It weights about 8 ounces.
  • It comes with a 1.4 inch speaker.
  • It is a compact system with a screen that allows users to play video from Amazon Video and more.
  • It has a 2.5 inch screen.
  • It can stream Wi-fi music (such as: Amazon Music, Pandora, and Spotify)
  • It connects with a 3.5 mm cable and/or Bluetooth.
  • Allows free audio calls to US, Mexico, and Canada.
  • When hooked up, it can control smart home devices.
  • Currently costs $129.99.

Echo Show

  • The Echo Show is 4 inches x 7.4 inches x 3.5 inches.
  • It weights about 0 ounces.
  • It has dual 2.0″ stereo speakers.
  • It has a screen that allows users to play video from Amazon Video and more.
  • It comes equipped with a 7 inch screen.
  • It can stream Wi-fi music (such as: Amazon Music, Pandora, and Spotify)
  • It connects through Bluetooth.
  • Allows free audio calls to US, Mexico, and Canada.
  • When hooked up, it can control smart home devices.
  • Currently costs $229.99.

Amazon Fire TV
Amazon Fire TV is a small black, box-like media console and is accompanied by the Amazon remote control. When hooked up to the internet, the media player allows users to stream media content on their television in high definition.

The Amazon Fire TV was released in the United States on April 12, 2014, Denmark on September 25, 2014, the United Kingdom on October 23, 2014, and in Japan on October 28, 2014.

Fire Tablet
Previously called the Kindle Fire, the Fire Tablet is a tablet computer. It was developed by Amazon.com. It is made with a Quanta Computer. It was first released in November 2011.

Dash Buttons
Dash buttons allow customers to reorder products at the touch of a dash button, away from their computer. Hit the dash button in their home and it automatically reorders household essentials before they run out.

Amazon Key
Amazon released Amazon Key and Amazon security camera with installation, October 2017. Amazon Key is allows Amazon delivery drivers to access a home to put the delivery in doors. During delivery, the Amazon security camera records the delivery to ensure the security of the customers home.

Amazon Go
Amazon Go is an Amazon store without a checkout stand. There are no lines to wait in. Buyers just need their Amazon Go app to enter the store and a credit card or debt card hooked up to their account.

Prior to January 2018, Amazon Go was in a Beta program and only open Amazon employees. But on Monday,  January 22, 2018, the store opened to the public.

Amazon GO is located in Seattle, Washington on the corner of 7th Avenue and Blanchard Street, at 2131 7th avenue.

At Amazon Go, buyers utilize Amazon’s “Just Walk Out Technology” that automatically detects when items are taken off shelves, returned to shelves, and leave the store. After a seller leaves the store, they are charged on their Amazon account and sent a receipt. 

Amazon Assistant Desktop
Amazon assistant is a desktop browser extension. It allows Amazon shoppers to compare prices, add items to their Amazon lists, and more.

Amazon Coins
Amazon Coin is a digital currency. It allows you to buy apps and games via Amazon’s app store.

$500 Amazon coins are equal to $5.

Buyers can earn up to 25% off items when buying Amazon coins.

The coins you buy do not expire.

Buyers can use Amazon coins in the Amazon Appstore on Fire tablets, Android devices, and Fire TV.

Amazon Web Services
First launching in 2002, AWS (or Amazon Web Services) provides cloud-computing platforms. It is accessible to individuals, companies, and governments. The service is used on a paid subscription basis. There is a free-tier option offered for the first 12 months.

For first quarter 2016, AWS revenue was $2.57 billion. During the same time period AWS had a net income of $604 million.

Founder Jeff Bezos portrayed AWS as a fast-growing $5 billion business.

The CIA (aka the US the Central Intelligence Agency) is an AWS customer.

In 2013 the CIA signed a $600 million dollar contract for cloud computing storage.

Amazon built a wind farm, taking up 34 square-miles, in North Carolina, USA. It was developed with the purpose of providing continuous power to the cloud-computing data centers.

Amazon Drive
Amazon drive is cloud based storage platform.

Amazon dominates by selling its own private label lines

Amazon Private Labels:

Pinzon
Late 2015, Amazon started using its own label “Pinzon” to sell its private label products.

Pinzon was initially used to sell household items such as kitchen utensils and textiles.

In March 2007, Amazon reportedly sought to use the Pinzon name to provide items such as cleaning supplies, carpet, wallpaper, paint, clothes, shoes, headgear, and jewelry.

Amazon Basics
Amazon’s private label brand AmazonBasics consists of electronic accessories, home accessories, and office accessories and supplies. The line was released in 2009 and provides items such as batteries, surge bars, and USB cables.

Amazon Elements
Amazon’s private label Amazon Elements was released in 2014. Amazon Elements provides household products such as baby wipes and cleaners.

Wickedly Prime
Amazon’s Wickedly Prime launched in the first half of 2017. Wickedly Prime items are only available to Amazon Prime members. The private label provides select foods such as cookies, cookie spread, tea, and chips.

Amazon dominates by offering exclusive marketing arrangements

Amazon Exclusive Marketing Arrangements
There are select products are only released on Amazon.com, or released on Amazon.com prior to being release elsewhere. These are called Amazon Exclusives. Examples of Amazon Exclusives may be DVDs, Albums, or books.

Amazon Dominates through Innovative Shipping and Delivery Programs

Amazon Flex
To keep up with the demands of Prime Now delivery, Amazon released Amazon Flex. Amazon Flex is a program developed so that independent contractors could provide delivery services to Amazon Prime members.

Amazon Prime Air
Amazon Prime Air includes Boeing planes and Drones.

Thank you to Amazon for use of their Video.

Prime Air – Airplanes: Contracted through Atlas Air, ABX Air, and Air Transport International, Amazon Prime Air is a cargo airline. It began in April 2017. It is based in Hebron, Kentucky, at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. The program currently has close to a 1.5 billion dollar expansion plan. The plan includes 200 landings and takeoffs each day. The plan also includes 40 Boeing planes (Boeing 767-300Fs).

Prime Air – Drones: Amazon Prime Air also includes a drone-based delivery system that is currently being established. Prime Air is a service that will allow delivery to take place in 30 minutes or less. The service will be limited to orders weighing 5 pounds or less.

The Prime Air test program is currently underway in the United Kingdom. The First Prime Air delivery was made December 7, 2016 in the UK. It was a fully autonomous (no human pilot) delivery. It was 13 minutes from purchase click to drone delivery.

Thank you to Amazon.com for use of their Video.

Jeff Bezos explained more on drone delivery, “…It could be a 10-mile radius from a fulfillment center. So, in urban areas, you could actually cover very significant portions of the population. And so, it won’t work for everything; you know, we’re not gonna deliver kayaks or table saws this way. These are electric motors, so this is all electric; it’s very green, it’s better than driving trucks around. This is…this is all an R&D project.”

“These are autonomous. So you give ’em instructions of which GPS coordinates to go to, and they take off and they fly to those GPS coordinates.”

 


“Jeff Bezos Revealed: Building Amazon One Box at a Time” Thank you to Bloomberg for the use of this video.

Amazon Dominates because of who its founder is: Jeff Bezos, from teenage ranch hand to richest man in the world

Why was Bezos able to turn Amazon into the machine it is today? Why is Bezos so successful? The answers can be found in Bezos’ past.

Bezos spent at least 12 summers growing up working with his grandfather (Pops) on their 25,000-acre cattle ranch. Bezos’ incredible work ethic formed in his early years, not only by handling the demanding work on the ranch but also by spending time in the presence of his grandpa. His grandfather, a former successful rocket scientist (working on space technology and missile defense systems) turned rancher (hard worker, innovator, builder, and mechanic) helped cultivate Bezos’ creativity, curiosity, work ethic, and hands-on technical abilities.

“Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and brother Mark give a rare interview about growing up and secrets to success”
Thank you to Summit for the use of this video.

From a young age, Bezos had drive and a strong push towards inventiveness. He also saw the importance of making a product more affordable. In elementary school, Bezos admired the Infinity cube. The infinity cube was a motorized mechanism of mirrors. It allowed people to “stare into infinity.” It was priced at $20 and Bezos’ mom would not buy it for him. Bezos purchased the pieces to make an inexpensive version of the cube himself.

Admiring his grandfather’s work past and falling in love with Star Trek, Bezos was interested in space travel. In his early school day years, Bezos communicated to teachers that, “the future of mankind is not on this planet.” In high school, he ended his valedictorian speech with, “Space, the final frontier, meet me there.” As a young adult, Bezos knew space travel was in his future. Forging his own dreams into a reality, in 2000 Bezos incorporated Blue Origin, a company in the space travel arena. “We have to go to space to save Earth.” “The most important work I’m doing is Blue Origin, and pushing forward to get humanity established in the solar system.”

Bezos hasn’t let adversity, risk, or failure hold him back. He has built an empire.

Bezos’ past made him who he is and who Jeff Bezos is made Amazon a reality.

Timeline:
In 1964, Jeff Bezos was born as Jeffrey Preston Jorgenson (in Albuquerque, New Mexico). Jeff was born to Jacklyn (Jackie) and Theodore (Ted) John Jorgensen. At the time of Jeff’s birth, Jackie was only 17 years old and still attending high school.

In 1968, Jackie married her second husband Miguel (Mike) Bezos. Mike was a Cuban immigrant who came to the United States alone when he was just 15 years old. That same year, Bezos’ mother told his biological father, a former circus performer, to stay out of their lives and Mike adopted Jeff. Jeff Jorgenson’s name was officially changed to Jeffrey Preston Bezos.

That year the family moved to Houston, Texas, close to Jackie’s family. Lawrence Preston Gise, Bezos’ maternal grandfather, owned a 25k acre cattle ranch in Cotulla, Texas. The ranch was name The Lazy G. Gise had recently retired from being a rocket scientist. Gise was now a rocket scientist turned cattle rancher. For the next 12 years, until he reached the age of 16, Bezos spent each summer working on the ranch with his grandpa, undertaking chores such as castrating bulls and fixing windmills.

Before retirement, “Gise worked on space technology and missile defense systems at Darpa in the late 1950s; in 1964, Congress appointed him manager of the Atomic Energy Commission’s Albuquerque operations office, where he supervised 26,000 employees in the AEC’s western region, including the Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Livermore laboratories.”

In 1974, when he was 10 years old, Bezos learned that Mike was not his biological father “but says he was more fazed about learning he needed to get glasses than he was about the news.”

In 1982 Bezos graduated from Palmetto Senior High School in Miami as valedictorian.

In 1986 Bezos graduated with a degree in both electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University.

In 1990 Bezos DE Shaw & Co., a quantitative Wall Street hedge fund.

In 1994, Bezos left D.E.Shaw & Co.

“Amazing Amazon Story – Jeff Bezos Full Speech – the real story of Amazon.com”
Thank you to Corporate Valley for the use of their video

A legacy was born: In 1994, Cadabra was incorporated in Washington State (Cadabra later becomes Amazon)

Jeff Bezos founded Amazon in 1994.

On April 3, 1995, the company processed its first sale.

Amazon’s first book was sold to a man named John Wainwright. He paid $27.95 for “Fluid Concepts And Creative Analogies: Computer Models Of The Fundamental Mechanisms Of Thought” by Douglas Hofstadter.

On July 16, 1995, Amazon.com launched as a beta site.

When the website launched, the only product category was books.

Amazon began with just one employee along the side of Jeff Bezos, Shel Kaplan.

In the first week of the Amazon.com going live, Amazon processed over $12k in orders.

In early years, Bezos used second hand computers for business operations.

Amazon.com generated orders from all 50 US states and 45 different countries during the initial 30 days of business.

In 1997 Amazon went public.

1997 Amazon raises $54 million with a valuation of $438 million.

1998 to 2000 Amazon raises $2.2 billion in debt.

In June 1998, Amazon launched its music store.

In October 1998, Amazon went international- launching in Germany and the United Kingdom.

In 1999 Amazon bought Alexa Internet for $250 million. Alexa Internet is a database company.

In 1999, Amazon bought Exchange.com for $645 million. Exchange.com is an online book marketplace

In 2001, to reduce costs Amazon decided to lay off 1300 employees and close a distribution facility.

Amazon became the quickest growing internet company when revenue reached $1.8 billion within 5 years of launching.

Less than 7 years after Amazon.com launched (in January 2002), Amazon experienced its first profitable quarter with $5 million profit.

In 2000, Bezos incorporated Blue Origin. (Blue Origin is a private company that is devoted to lowering the price of accessing outer space.

“NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver meets Blue Origin Founder Jeff Bezos.”

In 2000, Time Magazine names Bezos Man of the Year

In 2000, Amazon released its free shipping service for orders over $100.

In 2002, Amazon lowered the free shipping minimum to orders over $25.

In 2004, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $6.92 billion.

In 2005, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $8.49 billion.

In 2006, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $10.71 billion.

November 2007, the Amazon kindle launched. It was sold-out within 6 hours. New supply did not go on sale until May 2008.

In 2007, Amazon purchased the company Brilliance Audio.

In 2007, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $14.84 billion.

In 2008 Amazon acquired Audible for $300 million. Audible is a spoken audio entertainment and information company.

In March 2008, Amazon acquired the company com.

In August 2008, Amazon purchased Shelfari.

In 2008, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $19.17 billion.

In 2009, Amazon bought Zappos for $1200 million. Zappos is an online shoes sales company.

In 2009, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $24.51 billion.

In 2010 Amazon purchased Woot for $110 million. Woot is an internet retailer.

In 2010, Amazon purchased Quidsi $545 million. Quidsi is an online retailer.

In 2010, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $34.2 billion.

The Power of Jeff Bezos – Interview Oct 2016
Thank you to Startup Cat for the use of this video.

In 2011, Amazon acquired LoveFilm for $312 million. LoveFilm is a streaming video on demand provider.

In 2011, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $48.08 billion.

In 2012, Amazon purchased Kiva Systems for $775 million. Kiva Systems is a warehouse robot systems company.

In 2012, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $61.09 billion.

In 2013 Amazon acquired Goodreads for $150 million. Goodreads is on online community.

2013 For 250 million, Bezos purchased the Washington Post Newspaper.

In 2013, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $74.45 billion

In 2014, Amazon acquired Twitch for $970 million. Twitch provides video platform for video games.

In April 2014, Amazon bought ComiXology.

In 2014, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $88.99 billion

In 2015, Amazon’s net sale revenue was $107.01 billion

In 2016, Jeff Bezos earned a total compensation of $1,681,840. Of this, $81,840 was salary while the remaining amount ($1,600,000) came from other types of compensation (but not bonus or stock).

In 2017, Amazon acquired Whole Foods for $13.7 billion.

Whole Foods
In 2017, Amazon acquired Whole Foods for $13.7 billion.
Amazon purchased Whole Foods because “the need for physical stores combining with online in grocery has clearly arrived and even Amazon sees that it can’t go it alone anymore.”

July 2017, Bezos became the world’s richest person.

“15 Things You Didn’t Know About Jeff Bezos”
Thank you to Alux.com for the use of this video.

Amazon continues to dominate by offering a wide array of subscriptions and services to meet their customers’ needs.

What is Amazon Prime?
Amazon Prime is a subscription service offered by Amazon.com for a fee. The service began in the United States on February 2, 2005.

Amazon Prime started as a subscription service that gave people free two-day shipping when they subscribed by paying an annual fee of $79. The subscription fee also granted members access to discounted 1 day shipping.

In year 2016, Amazon Prime generated $6.4 billion dollars. Amazon Prime was estimated to have over 80 million subscribers as of April 2017 (Consumer Intelligence Research Partners).

As of December 5, 2017, to become an Amazon Prime member you can either pay $99 annually or $10.99 a month.

A person can subscribe solely to Prime Video with an $8.99 a month membership fee.

Prime offers free 30-day memberships so people can subscribe risk-free to experience being a Prime Member first hand before committing to paying for a membership.

Amazon maintains and expands their customer base by offering endless perks to its loyal Prime Members

Free Two-Day Delivery
Amazon Prime members get free two-day shipping on eligible purchases.

Free Same Day Delivery
Free same day delivery in selected zip codes.

Amazon Prime Video
Unlimited streaming of certain TV shows and movies (free with US memberships) with the ability to purchase other tv shows or movies for a fee.

Amazon Prime Video is a streaming TV/Movie service available to Prime subscribers. It includes the option to add and remove channel subscriptions or buy movies and TV shows that are not included with the Prime Membership. Such subscription add-on channels include: Showtime, HBO, Starz, and Cinemax.

In the United States, Amazon Video originally launched in September 2006 as Amazon Unbox. Two years later, in September 2008, Amazon Unbox became Amazon Video on Demand. Less than three years later, In February of 2011, Amazon rebranded the streaming service again, naming it Amazon Instant Video. It now gave Prime Members access to 5k shows and movies.

Kindle Owners’ Lending Library
Ability to “borrow” books from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library

Prime Now
Free 2-hour delivery in selected zip codes for selected products. Instead of free 2-hour delivery, a delivery time can be scheduled. (10k plus items offered in area such as electronics or groceries.) Prime Now also includes delivery from local stores.

In December 2014 Prime Now launched on the east coast. Prime Now is a super fast delivery service exclusively for Prime members. It is only available in select zip codes. Prime Now is a free 2 hour delivery service on select items. Prime Now deliver household items, electronics, and essentials.

By July 2016, Amazon Prime Now had been expanded to include: various parts of the United States including parts of Atlanta, Nashville, Chicago, Baltimore, Seattle, San Antonio, Dallas, Austin, Tampa, Miami, and Portland.

Exterior of the US, Prime Now has launched in parts of Barcelona, Birmingham, Tokyo, London, Milan, UK, Munich, Singapore, Berlin, Manchester, Newcastle, Liverpool, Paris, and Madrid.

Prime Now also allows you to shop local stores in select cities, such as Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, San Diego, Manhattan, Minneapolis, Portland, Dallas, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Local stores currently include Amazon, Sprouts Farmers Market, Plum Market, New Seasons Market, PCC Natural Markets, and Eataly Alti Cibi.

Prime Day
Prime Day is the annual celebration of Amazon’s birthday. It launched in July 2015 for Amazon’s 20th birthday. It’s commemorated with Prime Member exclusive deals that rival Black Friday discounts. Non-prime members do not have access to the discounts.

Release-Date Delivery
Free delivery on pre-ordered items. The eligible items will be delivered on their release date.

Amazon Music
Competing with Spotify/Google Play, iTunes, and Pandora, Prime Music is a streaming library of music, free for Prime members (in the US and Puerto Rico). Amazon Music provides members access to over 2 million songs and playlists. Streaming is advertisement free.

Amazon Music Unlimited
Amazon Music Unlimited gives people access to tens of millions of songs and hundreds of playlists. Amazon Prime members can take advantage of discounted monthly or annual plans.

Amazon Music only offers access to 2 million songs. Amazon also released Amazon Music Unlimited for those who need a more expansive library of music options. Unlimited has over 10 million songs but is not free for Prime members. Membership fees are $7.99 for Prime subscribers and $9.99 for non-Prime subscribers.

Prime Photos
Photo storage with unlimited GB (however, video storage is limited).

Amazon Prime Pantry
In select zip codes, Prime members have the ability to shop for groceries and household goods while only paying a small delivery fee. (Excludes Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska)

Prime Pantry began in April 2014. Amazon will ship 1 box filled with grocery store goods (that are non-perishable) for a flat delivery fee. Prime Pantry is a service available to Prime members in the Unites States, Germany, the UK, Austria, France, Spain, Japan, and Italy.

Prime Pantry is sent separate than Prime orders.

Currently, the Prime Pantry delivery fee is $5.99 per box. Each box can fit up to 45 lbs. of goods.

Prime shipments are sent via standard ground shipping and should arrive within 1-4 business days.

Currently, Prime Pantry does not deliver to Hawaii or to Alaska.

Amazon Fresh
Amazon Prime members in specific zip codes may pay an additional monthly fee to receive free shipping on Amazon Fresh orders (minimum $50 order). Alternatively, Prime members can pay a flat fee for orders under $50.

AmazonFresh is a grocery pickup and delivery service. It is only available to Amazon Prime subscribers. It is currently available in select zip codes in the United States, Tokyo, Australia, Hamburg, Berlin, Munich and London.

Amazon Fresh is only accessible by paying an add-on monthly fee or a flat fee on orders $50 or more. The add-on monthly membership fee is currently $14.99 and is billed separately from your prime membership.

Important Note on AmazonFresh:
Amazon Fresh does not deliver to dorms.

An order must be $50 or more to qualify for free delivery under a $14.99 a month subscription.

Orders under $50 will incur a delivery fee of $9.99.

AmazonFresh Pickup launched in March 2017 as a pickup service for selected zip codes. Members shop online and then schedule a time to pickup their groceries. When the Prime subscriber arrives to get their order, they’re order is loaded into their trunk.

As of July 2017, AmazonFresh reportedly launched their own meal kits.

Short lived for some cities, in November 2017, Amazon announced it would no longer offer its AmazonFresh service to specific zip codes in New Jersey, Maryland, California Pennsylvania, New York, and Delaware.

AmazonFresh allows subscribers to purchase grocery items and selected items from Amazon.com.

AmazonFresh with process home delivery orders on the same day or the next day. Delivery day will be determined by the time the order was placed and the availability of AmazonFresh delivery trucks.

Amazon Restaurants
Amazon Restaurants offers free restaurant delivery to Prime Members if they meet the minimum order requirement. Currently, Amazon Restaurants are only available for members in select zip codes and from select restaurants. Deliveries usually occur within an hour or less.

The local restaurant delivery service is only available for select restaurants and for selected zip codes. Currently, Amazon Restaurant delivery is only available in these select places: Las Vegas, San Diego, Austin, Manhattan, Washington, D.C., Phoenix, Brooklyn, Seattle, Dallas, San Francisco, San Jose, Oakland, Los Angeles, Orange County, Chicago, Atlanta, Houston, Miami, Baltimore, Minneapolis, Tampa, Orlando, Northern Virginia, Columbus, and Portland.

Amazon Elements
Amazon Elements is Amazon’s private label for everyday essentials. Only Amazon Prime member have access to it.

Amazon Dash for Prime
Dash buttons allow you to reorder products at the touch of a dash button, away from your computer. Hit the button in your house to automatically reorder your household essentials before you run out.

Prime Early Access
Amazon Prime members get a head start on Lightening Deals. Prime subscribers get access 30 minutes before regular folk do.

Prime Reading
Prime members have access to the Prime Reading Catalog. Here you can select books, magazines, or other media to read. Amazon Prime members get a head start on Lightening Deals. Prime subscribers get access 30 minutes before regular folk do. Prime Reading Catalog media can be read on a Fire tablet, a Kindle e-reader, or a Kindle.

Amazon First Reads
US Prime subscribers have early access rights to download one new book (for free each month) off of the Amazon First Read picks list. Members also have the ability to buy hardcover books at prime rates.

Audible Channels for Prime
Prime members get free access to Audible Channels (instead of paying $60 annually). Audible Channels for Prime allows unlimited access to niche playlists and original audio series. There are also Prime Exclusive Audiobooks. These Prime Exclusive Audiobooks include classics, great family picks, and narrated best sellers. To take advantage of the Audible Channels for Prime just download the Audible app and sign in to your prime account.

Video Add-On Subscriptions
Prime subscribers can access video add on subscriptions for a fee.

Deals and Discounts Compliments of Amazon Family
Prime subscribers get access to the “subscribe and save” function on Amazon. This rewards purchasers with discounted rates on things such as diapers, baby food, and toiletries. It also give expecting families 15% off of their baby registry items via a completion coupon.

Twitch Prime
Twitch is a gamers channel/app. Prime Members get discounted rates on pre-ordered physical games and on newly released games. When members link their Amazon Prime account to Twitch.tv they’ll be able to enjoy a free Twitch channel subscription, advertisement free watching, and access to free games.

 Amazon Households
Amazon Households is an Amazon membership sharing benefit. Two adults living in one home can create and share an Amazon Household. This allows two people to share their Prime benefits. Amazon Households also allows up to 4 teen profiles for kids between the ages of 13 and 17. This allows the teens to stream and shop with their own login while still keeping parents informed. Amazon Households also allows up to 4 child profiles for kids age 12 and under. This allows kids to access streaming but does not allow for kids to purchase things on Amazon.

Personal Amazon Prime and Amazon Business
If an Amazon Prime account holder also has an Amazon Business account, they can share the membership between the two accounts instead of paying for 2 Prime membership subscriptions.

Prime Rewards
Eligible Amazon Prime members can use the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Card or Amazon Prime Store Card to get 5% back. Also, if reloading an Amazon gift card, members get 2% rewards.

Notable Prime Warnings:
Some products are not available to two day shipping due to specific circumstances. Those products will be eligible for free standard shipping (where delivery is made in 4-5 business days). You will be notified at purchase of such conditions.

Prime isn’t available for businesses to purchase items to resell.

An Amazon Prime membership can’t be used to ship products to one’s customers.

Prime Memberships are subject to sales tax in select states in the United States.

Benefits can change without notice so check Amazon’s Prime Terms and Conditions page.

Guest Members (people added on to a membership but not in an Amazon Household) are not eligible for the following benefits: Amazon membership sharing, Prime Photos, Prime Video, Prime Music, Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, Subscribe and Save discounts, or Family discounts.

Amazon Prime Student subscribers do not have the option to share their membership.


Timeline of Amazon Prime and Services Offered to Prime Members
In February 2005 Amazon Prime was founded in the Unites States.

In 2007, the subscription service was extended to the UK, Japan, and Germany.

In 2008, Amazon Premium was released in France.

In 2011, Amazon Prime became accessible in Italy.

Canada gained access to Amazon Prime in 2013.

July 2016, India got Amazon Prime services and most recently, in March 2017, Mexico gained access.

Prime subscribers have access to Amazon Video in the United States, Germany, India, and the United Kingdom, without any additional fees. Amazon Video allows people to instantly stream certain movies and videos.

Starting in November 2011, Amazon allowed Prime subscribers to use the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library. This gave Prime Members access to read 1 of the selected e-books a month, without a due date.

In March 2014, Amazon raised the annual membership fee from $79 a year to $99 annually and then subsequently announced its new service, Prime Music. Prime Members now had free use of Amazon Music, which provides users with advertisement-free, unrestricted access to streaming a million plus songs and pre-created playlists.

Prime Photos was added to Amazon’s list of services in November of 2014. Prime Photos allows unlimited photo storage (and limited video storage) through Amazon Drive.

Free same-day delivery was accessible for Amazon Prime members in select US areas, starting in May 2015.

In Munich Germany (April 2015), Amazon launched a pilot program with DHL and Audi. The program was designed to get packages delivered to the trunks of Audi drivers.

To celebrate Amazon’s 20th birthday, Amazon created Amazon Day. July 15, 2015 would be the first annual Prime Day; a day to celebrate Amazon’s birthday with featured deals for Amazon Prime subscribers. The deals were set to rival deals found on Black Friday.

July 2015, Amazon signed the BBC’s former Top Gear team (James May, Richard Hammond, and Jeremy Clarkson) for filming a season of The Grand Tour (released in 2016).

At the end of 2015, Amazon stated that they had “tens-of-millions” Amazon Prime subscribers.

December 2015, Amazon announced its Streaming Partners Program. This program grants Prime members the option of adding additional streaming options to their account for a minimal fee. Examples include Starz and Showtime.

According to Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, January 2016 marked 54 million Amazon Prime memberships. Multiple reports that month expressed that almost 50% of households in the United States were Amazon Prime members.

Amazon expanded its same day delivery service to cover 13 more metropolitan areas in April 2016. This upped their same day delivery coverage from 14 to 27 metropolitan areas.

In London (September 2016), Amazon launched their restaurant delivery service where there is no delivery fee for Prime members if the order is £15.00 or more.

In September 2016, Twitch (a subsidiary of Amazon) released premium services for Prime subscribers only. Twitch Prime includes ad-free access to the Twitch services as well as monthly video game offers and other additional content.

In the last month of 2016, Amazon began allowing people to subscribe to Amazon Prime at a monthly rate instead of annually. The monthly fee was $10.99.

In December 2016, Amazon released their private-label food and drink line for Prime members, Wickedly Prime.

June 2017, Amazon released their service Prime Wardrobe. This is a clothing service that allows people to try on clothing prior to purchasing them.

Also in 2017, Amazon released their Prime Exclusive Phone program. The program offers certain smartphones at a discounted rate if the customer agrees for Amazon to show ads on their locked screen. Some of the smartphone companies include Motorola, LG, and Nokia.

During October 2017, Amazon released Amazon Key and Amazon security camera with installation. Amazon Key is an innovation that allows Amazon delivery drivers to gain access to the home to put the delivery in doors. During delivery, the Amazon security camera records the delivery to ensure the safety of the customers home. Amazon Key service has only been released in select United States zip codes.

Amazon Prime Day: Amazon is such a trendsetter that they created their own shopping holiday and people love to celebrate it annually.

What is Amazon Prime Day?
Amazon Prime Day or Prime Day was first launched as a way to commemorate Amazon’s 20th birthday in 2015. It is now an annual celebration marking Amazon’s birthday. It is solely for Prime members and is celebrated with thousands of discounted deals. The discounts found on Prime Day are those rivaling the deals found on Black Friday. New deals begin throughout the day, some launching as quickly as every 5 minutes. Prime Day deals include discounted deals on Prime Pantry, Kindle Unlimited, Shopping on Amazon.com, Amazon Music Unlimited, Amazon Video, and more.

When did Prime Day begin?
The first annual Prime day was July 15, 2015.

Prime Day has now occurred annually in July for three years running. It occurred on July 15, 2015, July 12, 2016, and July 17, 2017.

What are the ways to find deals?
On www.amazon.com/primeday or via the “Shop all Deals” hyperlink, you will find Spotlight Deals and Lightening Deals. Prime Day spotlight deals are popular bands and items at a very discounted rate. Throughout Prime Day, Lightening Deals are launched as quickly as every 5 minutes. Lightening deals are different in that they have limited quantity and are only available for a limited amount of time. Lightening deals are viewable 24 hours prior to the launch

Amazon dominates through streamlining the selling process and ability for others.

Fulfillment by Amazon (or FBA) allows sellers to automate their business, selling and shipping products, without ever touching the product, dealing with customer service, or handling returns.

This saves sellers time and allows them to quickly grow their business.

Selling on Amazon with FBA

What is Amazon FBA?

Amazon stores sellers’ products, packs orders, ships orders, provides customer service, and handles returns.

“What is Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA)?”
Thank you to Amazon for the use of this video.

Fulfillment by Amazon (or FBA)
Sellers mail their product inventory to Amazon fulfillment centers. Amazon stores the inventory. A seller sells their product on Amazon.com (or other outlets) and amazon packs, ships, and mails the product order. Amazon will then handle returns and any customer service.

Amazon says that the benefits of using Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) are as follows:

  • Free Shipping or Amazon Prime on qualifying orders
  • “Competitive pricing” and listing – FBA listings are sorted by product price without additional shipping fees since FBA sellers have free shipping or Amazon Prime shipping.
  • “Trusted Customer Service and Returns.” The Fulfillment by Amazon logo is present on FBA listings alerting the customer to the fact that the sale will be handled by Amazon.
  • Amazon fulfillment for seller’ other ordering networks. Sellers can set up FBA so that a seller’s orders coming from other sales channels are fulfilled by Amazon. This allows sellers to control inventory through their Amazon seller central account.
  • Gift wrapping services on eligible orders.

“How Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) works”
Thank you to Amazon for the use of their video.

How to sell with Amazon FBA

#1. Send inventory to Amazon fulfillment centers
Send inventory to Amazon fulfillment centers (new or used products)
Create a product listing in the corresponding seller central account.
Have Amazon to fulfill orders on all inventory or just a portion of inventory.
Utilize an outside carrier or Amazon’s reduced rate shipping

#2. Product Inventory is stored at Amazon
When Amazon receives seller’s inventory, they scan the inventory.
Amazon makes a record of the product unit dimensions.
Each seller monitors inventory using Amazon’s integrated tracking structure.

“How Amazon Receives Your Inventory”


Thank you to FulfillmentbyAmazon for the use of their video.

#3. A seller’s product is purchased by a customer (on Amazon.com or though a seller’s other sales channel).
Sellers utilizing FBA will have listings that are ranked by price without shipping costs (because they are eligible for free shipping).
For qualified products on FBA listings, Amazon Prime subscribers can upgrade shipping selections.

#4. The ordered product is grabbed from storage and then packed.
Amazon uses their advanced web-to-warehouse technology to locate and grab the product for shipment.
One FBA seller’s ordered product may be combined with another FBA seller’s ordered product.

#5. Amazon mails the package out for delivery.
Orders will be shipped via the shipping method a customer selects.
Tracking information is provided to the customer
If the order was placed through Amazon.com, the customer can utilize Amazon’s customer service.

How Sellers Get Started with FBA
A seller is registered with FBA automatically when they sign up to sell on Amazon through the seller’s central platform. A seller lists inventory/products by selecting FBA as their method for shipping.

If a seller already has existing inventory, they can also switch it over to FBA.

In a seller central account, in the page for managing inventory, a seller can mark the products they’d like to sell via Fulfillment by Amazon. They can do so by going to Manage inventory, selecting the product they’d like to switch to FBA, and click “change to fulfilled by Amazon.” Then click “convert and send inventory.” If there are more inventories to send for FBA, add the rest of the products prior to clicking on “convert and send inventory.” Click “convert only” instead. Then when a seller is ready to send, they can click “convert and send inventory.”

“How To Send A Shipment To Amazon FBA”

Thank you to Project Life Mastery for the use of their video

Amazon’s Seller University
Amazon’s Seller University provides sellers with training on how to do things with Amazon.

70 Stats and Facts that prove Amazon Dominates in Shopping and Everything Else

Amazon draws nearly 184 million visitors a month

In 2016 Amazon generated $135 billion in sales

For 2017, Amazon is on track to hit $170 billion in sales

Amazon’s revenue and total company values are currently at all time highs

Amazon had its biggest single sales day ever with Prime Day 2017. Amazon reported that sales on Prime Day 2017 grew by over 60% (year over year) and that the day’s sales surpassed the sales on Amazon for 2016 Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Earlier this year, Jeff Bezos (Amazon’s founder) became the richest person in the world.

Amazon is constantly breaking records and making headlines with acquisitions and technology innovations. Earlier this year it acquired Whole Foods for over $13 billion and launched a pilot program for drone delivery.

Amazon has expanded into 10 Global Markets with over 96 fulfillment centers.

Building a business leveraging a platform like Amazon is reportedly a once in a 200-year period opportunity.

1 out of 10 purchases is made online and Amazon sales accounted for 43% of all internet transactions in 2016. This is a 30% gain over 2015. (Slice Intelligence)

 Amazon dominates in the shipping speed arena by processing orders and delivering goods 2-3 days faster than other merchants.

Amazon makes delivery via drone in 30 minutes or less.

In December 2016 Amazon was processing orders and delivering goods at an average rate of just under 3.5 days.

Amazon accounted for 53% of the annual ecommerce growth in 2016 with other merchants making up the other 47%. (Ecommerce grew by 24% in 2016)

In 2016, Amazon’s net revenue from ecommerce sales and service sales was $135.99 billion USD.

In 2016, Amazon.com had a net income of 2.37 billion USD.

From 2006 to 2016, net revenue generated from amazon.com increased by 1269%, from $10.71 billion USD to $135.99 billion USD.

A decade after being founded, Amazon’s net revenue from service sales and online shopping was $6.92 billion USD.

In 2016, over 32% ($44 billion USD) of combined revenue was generated from international revenue outlets.

Amazon spent over $9 billion USD on outbound shipping, while in 2009 they spent $924 million.

2016 $135.99 billion USD revenue breakdown by revenue channel:

$91.43 billion USD – Retail Product Revenue

$22.99 billion USD – Retail Third-Party Seller Services Revenue

$6.39 billion USD – Retail Subscription Services Revenue

$12.22 billion USD – Amazon Web Services Revenue

$2.95 billion USD – Other Revenue

As of March 2017, Amazon had an estimated 80 million U.S. Amazon Prime Members.

Amazon employed 341,400 part-time and full-time employees in 2016 (this does not include contractors or temporary workers).

Net revenue of Amazon: Q1 2016 to Q3 2017:

2016 Q1 – $29.13 billion USD

2016 Q2 – $30.40 billion USD

2016 Q3 – $32.71 billion USD

2016 Q4 – $43.74 billion USD

2017 Q1 – $35.71 billion USD

2017 Q2 – $37.96 billion USD

2017 Q3 – $43.74 billion USD

In the US, Amazon initially started as an online bookstore.

Amazon has retail websites for the US, Canada, Europe, UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Australia, Brazil, Japan, China, India, and Mexico.

During Q1 2017, there were over 2 billion website visits to amazon.com. This statistic includes all device visits. Desktop and Laptop visits exceeded visits from other devices.

300 million users as of 2/12/17

As of 7/20/16, there were 30 million average monthly Amazon mobile app users.

In 2016, there were over 100,000 Amazon sellers with over $100,000 in sales.

As of 1/25/17, there were 250 Amazon dash buttons.

As of 1/17/17, 50% of online shoppers in the United States were on the Amazon mobile app.

As of 12/21/16, 80% of US Amazon consumers purchase from Amazon at least 1 time each month.

As of 12/21/16, 20% of US Amazon consumers purchase from Amazon at least 1 time each week.

Amazon net sales in Q3 2017 was $43.74 million USD

Amazon net income in Q3 2017 was $256 million USD

For 2017 Amazon is projected to earn $1.65 billion USD revenue for digital ads.

As of 10/26/17, Amazon dominated 43.5% of the ecommerce retail market in the US.

As of 12/5/16, Amazon was spending $3 billion USD a year on video content.

As of 1/4/17, Amazon had $45k robots working in their warehouses.

44 percent of internet consumers skip google, yahoo, and bing to search directly in Amazon for products.

Amazon Best Sellers Rank (or sales rank) correlates with products listing ranks.

Amazon reportedly paid $13.7 billion for Whole Foods.

In early 2016, the average Amazon Prime user spent about $625 per year (Business Insider).

Over 20 million products are available for Amazon Prime (Recode.net).

Over 75% of consumers pay for Amazon Prime to take advantage of the free two day shipping perk for Amazon Prime members. (eMarketer).

Females make up about 65% of Amazon’s traffic.

Over 30% of United States online shoppers have an Amazon Prime membership. (Forbes)

Amazon has a loss somewhere between1 to 2 billion dollars a year on shipping.

Nearly half of Amazon Prime members spend $800+ a year on Amazon.

Over 40% of prime members spend over $800 in their first year as an Amazon Prime member.

Amazon went public in 1997.

Amazon’s Phoenix fulfillment center is equivalent to the size of 28 football fields.

An average of one new book is added to Amazon every five minutes

Amazon employs over 15000 robots to aid warehouse workers.

Only 11% of the Baby Boomer generation has Amazon Prime memberships while 16% of Generation X have Amazon Prime. The Millennial generation uses amazon prime the most with a 19% Amazon Prime membership rate. (eMarketer)

Amazon’s fastest delivery took place in under 10 minutes.

Initially Amazon relied on marketing via word of mouth. Although the company still relies on this, they have also become a high spender on Google Ads.